What is Writing Commons?

Writing Commons is a free, global, peer-reviewed, open-education resource for college-level writers, college faculty, and the everyday writer.

How can you navigate Writing Commons?

Who is the audience for Writing Commons?

As a global, worldwide resource, students consult Writing Commons to learn about writing processes, rhetoric, genre, research methodologies, peer review, and style.  Writing Commons is comprehensive enough to be assigned as the required textbook for any composition, public speaking, business writing, technical writing, or professional writing course.  

People from throughout the world consult our commons every day, seeking clarification about a range of questions, from "How can I be more productive and creative?" to  "How should I follow APA guidelines for research papers?"

Who is the publisher of Writing Commons?

Joseph M. Moxley serves as the Publisher and Executive Editor.  Moxley, a professor of English and director of composition at the University of South Florida, has been publishing Writing Commons since 2008 (more).  

Who are the people behind Writing Commons?

See StaffEditorial BoardReview Board for addresses and contact information.

What writing faculty or University Writing Programs have adopted Writing Commons?

Google Analytics enables us to identify where people come from (by using their IP Addresses if available), what pages they view, and when they view each page.  In 2013, we received over a million visitors. While we know the overall number of readers, we don't really know whom these numbers represent--i.e., who our users are and if they are consulting Writing Commons because of required coursework.  That said, in the Spring/Summer of 2013 Duke University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and the Ohio State University used Writing Commons as a primary and/or supplementary textbook for their composition MOOCs funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation

Students in the  First-Year Composition Program at the University of South Florida refer to Writing Commons through the Common Comments interface at My Reviewers.

Why are we publishing Writing Commons under a Creative Commons License?

By sharing our work with the world, we hope to help writers find their voices as individuals and citizens--that is, to learn to express, develop and articulate their thoughts in multiple media.  By sharing Writing Commons in an online, cell-phone friendly way, we hope to make knowledge about Writing Studies freely available, worldwide.  

Are all webtexts at Writing Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License?

All webtexts are licensed under a Creative Commons license.  Most webtexts are licensed under a CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 license, but a few are published under a CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 license.  The copyright for each webtext is either printed on the article or on the footer of the site.  Feel free to print, email, PDF and hyperlink to webtexts. 

How can I contribute to Writing Commons?

Please see Contribute.

Is it possible to get a print or ePub version of Writing Commons?

Not yet, although this sounds like a good idea.

Where is Writing Commons hosted?

Writing Commons has been hosted at Go Daddy since 2008.

How do I cite (MLA, APA. COS-humanities/sciences) Writing Commons?

MLA

Author’s name, last name first.  Title of article, enclosed in quotation marks.  Title of complete publication, in italics.  Date of publication (or n.d. if not dated).  Medium (e.g., Web).  Date of access (Month day year format).

    • Example: Yirinec, Jennifer A.  “Analyzing Evidence.”  Writing Commons: The Home for Writers, n.d.  Web.  9 April 2012.

APA

Author’s last name and initials.  Date of publication (if given).  Title of article, followed by “In” and the title of the complete publication (in italics).  “Retrieved from” followed by URL.

    • Example: Yirinec, J. A. (n.d.).  Analyzing evidence.  In Writing commons: The home for writers.  Retrieved from http://www.writingcommons.org/home/470-analyzing-evidence

COS - humanities

Author’s name, last name first.  Title of article, enclosed in quotation marks.  Title of complete publication in italics.  Date of publication (in day month year format) or “n.d.” if not dated.  URL (direct URL to article if available, followed by date of access, enclosed in parentheses, in day-month-year format.

    • Example: Yirinec, Jennifer A.  “Analyzing Evidence.”  Writing Commons: The Home for Writers.  N.d.  http://www.writingcommons.org/home/470-analyzing-evidence (9 April 2012).

COS - sciences

Author’s last name and initials.  Title of article, followed by “In” and the title of the complete publication (in italics).  URL, followed by date of access enclosed in parentheses.

    • Example: Yirinec, J. A. (n.d.).  Analyzing evidence.  In Writing commons: The home for writers. http://www.writingcommons.org/home/470-analyzing-evidence (9 April 2012).