A free, comprehensive, peer-reviewed, award-winning Open Text for students and faculty in college-level courses that require writing and research.

 

 unCommon News


 A crowd-powered newsletter for a writing-centered community.


 Issue 5, October, 2012


Hello friends, 

We hope your writing and teaching are going well, that Septemer was a productive and creative month for you.

Just about every writer enjoys having his or her work distributed widely.  In a world of information overload attentive readers can be scarce!  That's why, we suppose, we're so excited that traffic has been picking up at Writing Commons.  During September, we had 18,939 visitors, 32,608 pages views, In the last week alone, we've had over 6800 users, over 10,000 page views.

In light of our mission to help writers worldwide, we're excited to welcome new faculty members to our distinguished editorial board: Professor Ilana Snyder, Monash University, Australia and Professor Taku Sugimoto, Chiba Institute of Technology, Japan.  We feel really luck to be in such good company, and we thank all of the dedicated faculty who serve on our Editorial Board and Review Board. 

We also wish to congratulation three new authors to Writing Commons:  Matt Barton's "A Student Guide to Using Wikis"; Kimberly Karalius' "Fan Fiction in the Composition Classroom"; and Brogran Sullivan's "Active Reading."

In this issue we will explore:

  • Call for Papers: Information Literacy
  • How to Cite Writing Commons Web Texts
  • Social Media

 

Call for Papers


As an organic, digital, recursive text, we are interested in receiving new and interesting webtexts to expand the breadth and depth of what we can offer our global community of writers.

While we welcome submissions covering all aspects of writing, we are especially in need of content focused on information litearcy. Submission should be between 500 and 1,000 words, and should take advantage of the capablities offered by the digital space (i.e., the ability to include Creative Commons-licenced images, to embed YouTube or other videos, to hyperlink, etc). Topics may address:
  • What is information literacy? (an introduction to the concept)
  • Determining what information you need
  • Approaching online sources / conducting research online
    • Identifying credible electronic sources
    • Discovering and using library databases
      • Understanding best resources for research
      • An annotated list of electronic databases that first-year undergraduate students might find particularly useful
    • Understanding the place of place of resources like Wikipedia  in the research process
  • Distinguishing between different types of sources (i.e., an edited collection, a book, a journal article, etc.)
  • Understanding the connection between writing and research
  • Citation Mining
  • Avoiding plagarism and citing correctly
    • Formatting according to Chicago style
    • Formatting according to Harvard style
Submissions should be sent as Word docs to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by December 1, 2012. If images are used, please attach them to the same email as seperate files (perferaly jpegs), indicating their placement within the text file. Citation should follow the current edition of the MLA Handbook. For more formatting and style, please see the "Guide for Authors." Queries are encouraged and may be directed to either Quentin Vieregge at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Jennifer Yirinec at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

How to Cite Writing Commons Webtexts on Your CV


Our thanks to Janice Walker for sharing this helpful outline on how to cite your peer-reviewed webtexts that are published at Writing Commons. When you submit your work to Writing Commons, our editors will give your work careful consideration. We endeavor to provide fast yet thorough decisions, and when you publish at Writing Commons, you can rest assured you're providing a valuable service to a worldwide community of writers.

MLA

Author’s name, last name first.  Title of article, enclosed in quotation marks.  Title of complete publication, in italics.  Date of publication (or n.d. if not dated).  Medium (e.g., Web).  Date of access (Month day year format).

Example:

Yirinec, Jennifer A.  “Analyzing Evidence.”  Writing Commons: The Home for Writers, n.d.  Web.  9 April 2012.

APA

Author’s last name and initials.  Date of publication (if given).  Title of article, followed by “In” and the title of the complete publication (in italics).  “Retrieved from” followed by URL.

Example:

Yirinec, J. A. (n.d.).  Analyzing evidence.  In Writing commons: The home for writers.  Retrieved from https://www.writingcommons.org/home/470-analyzing-evidence

COS - humanities

Author’s name, last name first.  Title of article, enclosed in quotation marks.  Title of complete publication in italics.  Date of publication (in day month year format) or “n.d.” if not dated.  URL (direct URL to article if available, followed by date of access, enclosed in parentheses, in day-month-year format.

Example:

Yirinec, Jennifer A.  “Analyzing Evidence.”  Writing Commons: The Home for Writers.  N.d.  https://www.writingcommons.org/home/470-analyzing-evidence (9 April 2012).

COS - sciences

Author’s last name and initials.  Title of article, followed by “In” and the title of the complete publication (in italics).  URL, followed by date of access enclosed in parentheses.

Example:

Yirinec, J. A. (n.d.).  Analyzing evidence.  In Writing commons: The home for writers. https://www.writingcommons.org/home/470-analyzing-evidence (9 April 2012).

 

Social Media


Keep up with Writing Commons using your favorite social networking sites.

Writing Commons has its own Facebook site, where we keep our status and postings relevant to the latest site information, as well as news about the greater Open Education Resource community.

Writing Commons is also available on Twitter using @writingcommons and #writingcommons. 

Writing Commons' tweets consist of answers to students' most common writing questions, such as "What's a paragraph supposed to have?" and "What's an argument, again?" Each tweet is hyper-linked to our Writing Commons blog, where Writing Commons staff provides succinct, accessible answers and helpful examples. 




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