Copyright

What is Copyright? In the United States, copyright law protects creators of “original works of authorship,” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and other intellectual works, against unlawful copying, distribution, performance, display, and derivatives (Copyright Act of 1976, 2001). In other words, when you compose any kind of work, whether it's an alphabetical text or some sort of visual work (e.g., a picture, information graphic, or painting), copyright protects your works from theft and derivative works that you do not approve. Why Does Copyright Matter? Copyright protection exists from the moment...

Read full article...

Guide to Using Online Images

Related Concepts: Best Search Tools for Images The first step to finding images for your project is to question whether or not your effort is commercial or noncommercial. Images, like words, have value: they are governed in society by conventions such intellectual property law. These laws are very important to society: they are designed to foster creativity and to incentivize entrepreneurship. Copyright policies protect the rights of authors and creators. And yet copyright policies may also inhibit the free flow of information, data. Proponents of open data, open networks, open...

Read full article...

Best Search Tools for Images

What are the Best Search Tools for Images? There are loads of very good search tools for finding images on the internet, including Creative Commons SearchGoogle ImagesWikimedia Commons In order to reuse an image you find on the internet, you need to ensure the copyright license associated with it permits reuse. Publishing copyrighted information without permission is unethical and can result in fines and legal consequences.Images, like other forms of intellectual property, have value. Some copyright licenses prohibit any reuse without some financial remuneration to the writer, speaker, knowledge worker...

Read full article...

Empathetic Information Literacy

What is Empathetic Information Literacy? Empathetic Information Literacy is a method of information literacy that consists of five moves: Pausing before accepting or rejecting a claimAsking questions about the claim, especially about whether it's trueCaring about the people involvedChecking the accuracy of the claim through credible sourcesActing on what you learn The goal of Empathetic Information Literacy is to better verify or "fact check" claims through attending not just to intellectual factors but also to affective factors—not just thoughts but also feelings. Writers, speakers, knowledge workers . . . may...

Read full article...

Interpretation, Interpretative Frameworks

What is Interpretation? Interpretation is the act of literacy, the human process of making inferences, of ascribing meaning to signs and symbols, the act of signification. People make interpretations of texts and events in order to make sense of world. Interpretation is a deeply subjective process. Different people can see the exact same event and infer contrasting interpretations. Critics often disagree about the relative merits of movies, songs, and other texts. For readers, listeners, users, interpretation is challenging. At any given moment, people experience a tsunami of information coming at...

Read full article...

What is Academic Dishonesty?

Academic Dishonesty Academic dishonesty is synonymous with cheating. Cheating can refer to a situation in which authors ask others to write a part of a document or the entire document. High schools and colleges in the U.S. have unique policies for addressing plagiarism. Some colleges, for example, expel students after their first offense; others place an "FF" on the student's transcript, creating a permanent blemish on the student's academic record. Students are guilty of academic dishonesty when they Secretly arrange to have an entire document written for them by other...

Read full article...

Anecdote, Anecdotal Evidence

Anecdote An anecdote is a short narrative explaining an event or experience of some sort. It is a particularly useful form of support when writing in the memoir and narrative genres. Let’s take a look at an example of a claim made for a literacy narrative that lacks an ensuing anecdote: When I first began to write academically in high school, I never fully integrated my evidence. This is because I did not view research as entering into a conversation. Now I know that research is more than just dropping...

Read full article...

Information Design

Information Design is a process—the act of designing information in order to facilitate clarity and interpretation.a subject of academic studyconventions, discourse patternsOrganizational SchemaParagraph SchemasRhetorical MovesSentence SchemasTransitional Language, Metalanguage, Sequesa set of interoperability standards that enable sharing of information across hardware platforms, software, and coding languages. Related Concepts: Design Thinking; Rhetorical Analysis; Rhetorical Moves; Rhetorical Reasoning

Read full article...

Information Architecture

Information architecture is a broad term that is used in different ways by different discourse communities, communities of practice. Information architecture the ordering of information into a schema that makes readers, listeners, users what the information is and how it can be accessed (information literacy practices and perspectives)the meta tagging and archiving of information so users and bots can find it during search and understand what it is they've found--how it's useful, significant or related to other information.web site design and interoperability standards of applications with other software tools Synonyms...

Read full article...