Paragraph Organization

Understand how to organize information in paragraphs so readers can scan your work and better follow your reasoning.

Unlike punctuation, which can be subjected to specific rules, no ironclad guidelines exist for shaping paragraphs. If you presented a text without paragraphs to a dozen writing instructors and asked them to break the document into logical sections, chances are that you would receive different opinions about the best places to break the paragraph. In part, where paragraphs should be placed is a stylistic choice. Some writers prefer longer paragraphs that compare and contrast several related ideas, whereas others opt for a more linear structure, delineating each subject on a one-point-per-paragraph basis. Newspaper articles or documents published on the Internet tend to have short paragraphs, even one-sentence paragraphs.

If your readers have suggested that you take a hard look at how you organize your ideas, or if you are unsure about when you should begin a paragraph or how you should organize final drafts, then you can benefit by reviewing paragraph structure. The following guidelines can give you some insights about alternative ways to shape paragraphs.

Note: When you are drafting, you need to trust your intuition about where to place paragraphs; you don’t want to interrupt the flow of your thoughts as you write to check on whether you are placing them in logical order. Such self-criticism could interfere with creativity or the generation of ideas. Before you submit a document for a grade, however, you should examine the structure of your paragraphs.

Additional articles on Paragraph-organization:

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  2. Conclude this Paragraph with Your Voice, Not Your Source’s

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  3. Conclusions

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  4. Paragraph Structure

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  5. Paragraph Transitions

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  6. Paragraphs Are Influenced by the Media of Writing

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  7. Paragraphs Flow When Information Is Logical

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  8. Paragraphs Must Logically Relate to the Previous Paragraph(s)

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  9. Paragraphs: Use an Inductive Structure for Dramatic Conclusions or Varied Style

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  10. What is the Point of this Paragraph?

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  11. Where is your topic sentence?

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